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How shareholders are pushing big banks for climate action

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  So far, many financial institutions have avoided decisive measures. But the pressure from activist shareholders isn’t going away. Credit...Patrick Semansky/Associated Press   By  Manuela Andreoni May 10, 2022 Original article here It’s hard to live without banks. But having an account often ties our money to the conveyor belt of global finance — and its effects on the climate. Take Citigroup, which owns Citibank, for example. The market research firm YouGov ranks Citibank  among the most popular banks in the United States . It’s also the world’s second-largest financier of fossil fuels, according to a  recent report by the Rainforest Action Network , an environmental group. Early last year, like many other financial institutions, Citigroup committed to stop adding greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere and to become carbon neutral by 2050. But when a small group of shareholders introduced a proposal pressing the bank to stop financing new fossil fuel projects this year,

B.C. First Nations leadership unveils strategy to fight climate change

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The strategy contains 27 themes, 63 objectives, and 143 strategic actions A couple are dwarfed by old growth trees as they walk in Avatar Grove near Port Renfrew, B.C., Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward COLE SCHISLER Apr. 23, 2022 4:11 p.m. Original story here The First Nations Leadership Council has unveiled the B.C. First Nations Climate Strategy. Released on Earth Day, the strategy outlines a vision, priorities and guiding principles for Indigenous-led climate action initiatives that recognize the inherent title, rights and treaty rights of First Nations. “Humanity and Mother Earth are suffering the consequences of human behaviour. Our ancestral lands, communities, and cultural identity depend on immediate climate action,” Regional Chief Terry Teegee of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations said in a news release. “The response from the provincial and federal governments is inadequate and insufficient to address the climate emergency and time is r

Hauling freight trains with electric locomotives is now starting to happen

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CN tests battery-electric locomotive, while CP and Southern Railway of B.C. look to hydrogen Emily Chung  · CBC News · Posted: May 05, 2022 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 2 hours ago Original story here   CN has purchased Wabtec's heavy-haul battery-electric locomotive, shown above, for testing. (Wabtec) Canada's railway giants, CN and CP, are testing battery and hydrogen locomotives in a move toward electric, zero-emissions freight rail. At least one smaller railway, Southern Railway of B.C., is working on hydrogen locomotive technology too. Here's a look at why they're electrifying and the technologies they're testing. Why the industry is moving toward electric Though the transportation sector is the second-biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions after oil and gas, the Railway Association of Canada says rail generates only  3.5 per cent of transportation emissions . Still, said Josipa Petrunic, president and CEO of the Canadian Urban Transit Research

16 Canadian cities projected to have the most extreme heat in the future: report

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Sarah Anderson | Apr 23 2022, 11:21 am Original  Article Here Joachim Zens/Shutterstock As climate change continues to be felt across Canada, a new report details which areas are set to be the hardest hit by extreme heat, according to a new report from the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation in partnership with the University of Waterloo. The report from April 2022, “Irreversible Extreme Heat: Protecting Canadians and Communities from a Lethal Future,” looks at what Canadians can do right now to reduce the risks of extreme heat in the future, Part of the report looks at extreme heat projections for Canadian communities, and they’ve identified several that are the most at-risk glimpsing into the future between 2051 and 2080. “Extreme temperatures and heat waves already occur across Canada and will become more extreme in the future,” reads the report. There are three main indicators of extreme heat:   Very hot days over 30°C Warmest maximum temperature Average heat-wave l

Canada's new climate plan demonstrates the price we pay for procrastination

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Actions taken a decade ago would be bearing fruit now. We're running out of time. Aaron Wherry  · CBC News · Posted: Mar 30, 2022 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: March 30 Original article here  A man holds a sign outside of the main RBC Royal Bank branch in Vancouver during a protest calling on the bank to divest from fossil fuel and oilsands funding on Tuesday, June 23, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck) Addressing unnamed politicians who would say that the current moment — with the war in Ukraine stoking inflation and driving up gas prices — is a bad time for fighting climate change, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told his audience in Vancouver on Tuesday that "this is no time for excuses." "The question is not whether we keep going on climate action," Trudeau argued. "The question is how much more we can do, and how quickly." The climate plan Trudeau's government released on Tuesday is one proposal for how much and how fast Canada should

Vantage Point Podcast with Michael Davis

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  In this interview we explored why we started OurKidsClimate, what we are trying to do, who it is for and what our sessions are like. Link to the podcast

The Canadian oil and gas companies that want to put the brakes on climate financial transparency

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Without more transparency, regulators warn Canada's economy will balloon into a 'climate bubble' that may suddenly burst, causing severe economic disruptions — not dissimilar to recent Russian divestment. But companies such as Suncor and TC Energy want to delay some new mandatory reporting rules, according to an investigation by The Narwhal By  Carl Meyer March 23, 2022  18 min. read Original article here While some economists warn Canada's economy is ballooning into a climate bubble that may burst and provoke severe disruptions, dozens of Canadian companies are pushing regulators of capital markets to delay new climate transparency rules. Mark Little wrapped up oilsands giant Suncor Energy’s February 2022 earnings call by reassuring investors that shareholders would have more cash in their pockets than the year before.  “We think we have a great company,” Little, Suncor’s CEO, said on the  Feb. 3 call , which lasted about 40 minutes. “I’m strengthening the